The Tutoring Center, Kansas City MO 

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05/06/2022


Autism and Aggressive Outburst

All parents, educators, therapists, and caregivers need to intervene when this happens. First and foremost, you must focus on what you can do as parents; how to address this problem and help your child with ASD manage and reduce these aggressive behaviors?

For Starters

The first step will be to understand its causes:
  • What function does this behavior have?
  • What is it trying to tell?
  • Analyze when these behaviors appear. For instance, environmental and personal factors such as noise, heat, and tiredness should be considered.
  • Begin to accompany your child with understanding and love.

Validate the Emotion but Not the Behavior

Children need to understand that it's legitimate for them to get angry but that aggressive behavior is not healthy to let their anger out. Thus, you will validate their feelings and emotions but not their feisty behavior. Below, you'll find a few suggestions to ease the situation:

Use Positive Reinforcement

The objective of this technique is to increase the frequency of appropriate or positive behaviors to counter aggression. One or more reinforcers are needed, which are all those behaviors, objects, measures, etc., that the autistic child finds rewarding, pleasurable, and motivating.

Contact a Child Psychologist

Finally, you must consider asking for help from a child psychologist if you feel that your child's disruptive behaviors are out of control and interfere with their functioning and well-being. A professional can analyze your case in a more specific and personalized way and offer you the tools you need to help your child correctly.

Help your student reach their academic goals with the assistance that one-to-one tutoring in Kansas City can provide. Call The Tutoring Center, Kansas City, at 816-781-0000. To request more information on their academic programs or schedule a free consultation.

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